Author(s): Neethu Varghese, John Shine

Email(s): Email ID Not Available

DOI: 10.52711/2349-2996.2021.00093   

Address: Neethu Varghese1*, John Shine2
1Lecturer, Fr. Mullers College of Nursing, Mangalore, Karnataka, India.
2Lecturer, Dept. of Nursing and Midwifery Wollega University, Ethiopia.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 11,      Issue - 3,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
Background: Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in women and primary target for prevention. Obesity is an important biological risk factor for cardiovascular disease (CVD). The main aim of this study was to answer the question regarding knowledge about preventive measures of CVD. A further aim was to replicate previous findings that obese individuals are at higher risk of developing other biological risk factors for CVD. Objectives of the study: To identify the knowledge level of obese women regarding prevention of cardiovascular disease in a selected community at Mangalore. Method: A descriptive study was conducted among 50 obese women who were selected by Purposive sampling technique. The study was conducted in local areas, at Mangalore. Data was collected through baseline information, structured knowledge questionnaire. The data collected was analysed and interpreted based on descriptive and inferential statistics. Result: Majority of the samples belonged in the age group of 40-45 years (40%), most of their BMI were in obese category (64%), nearly half of the subjects completed pre university education (40%), 64% of the subjects were office workers and have not attained menopause, almost half of them had 2 pregnancies (48%) and majority of them did not undergo hormone replacement therapy (80%), family history of CVD and obesity were 72% and 56% respectively, majority of people had personal history of diabetes mellitus (36%). With regard to level of knowledge, among 50 obese women 50% had average knowledge, 34% had good knowledge, 6% had very good knowledge and 10% had poor knowledge about prevention of cardiovascular diseases. There was a significant association for age, type of occupation, number of pregnancies, hormone replacement therapy and personal history of CVD with knowledge of obese women and no association found for BMI, menopause, family history of CVD and obesity. Conclusion: Knowledge level of obese women regarding prevention of cardiovascular diseases is comparatively low. Various multisectoral approaches are required to improve their knowledge which would help to improve their quality of life.


Cite this article:
Neethu Varghese, John Shine. A Study to assess the knowledge regarding prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) among Obese women in selected urban community areas at Mangalore. Asian Journal of Nursing Education and Research. 2021; 11(3):387-0. doi: 10.52711/2349-2996.2021.00093

Cite(Electronic):
Neethu Varghese, John Shine. A Study to assess the knowledge regarding prevention of Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD) among Obese women in selected urban community areas at Mangalore. Asian Journal of Nursing Education and Research. 2021; 11(3):387-0. doi: 10.52711/2349-2996.2021.00093   Available on: https://ajner.com/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2021-11-3-20


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