Author(s): Ramya Kundayi Ravi, Suma Paul, Neethu Jose

Email(s): raviramya11@gmail.com

DOI: 10.52711/2349-2996.2021.00109   

Address: Ramya Kundayi Ravi1, Suma Paul2, Neethu Jose3
1Assistant Manager – Training, SBN Techno Logics Pvt Ltd., Kochi, Kerala, India.
2Asst Professor, RAK Medical and Health Sciences University, Al Juwais - Al Qusaidat, PO Box 11172, Ras Al Khimah, UAE.
3Assistant Professor, Jubileee Mission Collge of Nursing, Thrissur, Kerala, India.
*Corresponding Author

Published In:   Volume - 11,      Issue - 4,     Year - 2021


ABSTRACT:
The nursing profession is labor intensive and nurses needs to regulate their emotions for the sake of their patients, their families and health care team member’s needs. The aim of the present study was to determine the level of emotional intelligence among nurses working in a selected tertiary care private hospital. A quantitative cross-sectional survey method, data was collected using a self-reported-questionnaires developed by Schutte from 717 registered nurses working in a tertiary care private hospital. A convnininece sampling technique was used to recruit the study participants. Data was analyzed using SPSS Version 24. The mean age of participants was 31.26±4.86 years; 93.4% (670) were females and 6.6% (47) were males. The total EI score ranged from 46 to 155 with a mean of 127.2311±10.1. Out of all, only 12% of the participants had above average, 3.5% had less than average and the remaining 84% had moderate levels of levels of EI levels. A statistically significant relationship was found between emotional intelligence and type of educational qualification and the total years of professional experience in the current area of work at 0.01 level. The moderate level of EI among majority of the participants revealed in the present study necessitates the need for conscious effort, education and training to improve the EI levels among nurses.


Cite this article:
Ramya Kundayi Ravi, Suma Paul, Neethu Jose. Emotional Intelligence among Nurses working in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Kerala, South India. Asian Journal of Nursing Education and Research. 2021; 11(4):451-4. doi: 10.52711/2349-2996.2021.00109

Cite(Electronic):
Ramya Kundayi Ravi, Suma Paul, Neethu Jose. Emotional Intelligence among Nurses working in a Tertiary Care Hospital, Kerala, South India. Asian Journal of Nursing Education and Research. 2021; 11(4):451-4. doi: 10.52711/2349-2996.2021.00109   Available on: https://ajner.com/AbstractView.aspx?PID=2021-11-4-1


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